Separation of Church and State is a Women's Issue in the US

Phyl Campbell By Phyl Campbell, 8th Sep 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/3ecay75z/
Posted in Wikinut>News>Politics

Separation of Church and State is a women's issue in the US. And our political leaders know it. As a matter of fact, in order to quell discussion of women's issues, men have often reverted to questionable military goals in the name of national security. And it's happening again with Syria.

Women's issues are affected by the joining of Church and State

Separation of Church and State in the United States is more important now than it has ever been before when it comes to the matter of the so-called women’s issues. In a Judeo-Christian society -- where the majority are Protestant Christians -- the Bible (and not the Constitution) is the law of the land. And the Bible, the oft-translated and misquoted Bible commissioned by King James and pressed into print by Gutenberg, is not friendly toward women. It isn’t even decent. In this version, the women ARE chattel. The women are subjugated. The women are unheard and oppressed and the cause of all male suffering.

Using Military Conflict to Avoid Feminist Platforms

Time and time again, the American government, up to and including the office of the President of the United States, has used military conflict as an excuse to put women off their platforms. Women were being burned as witches while the men declared no taxation without representation and broke from England. Women carried water pitchers and were nursemaids during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. They worked together for the cessation of slavery and ultimately for the right of black male suffrage. During the first World War, the National Association of Women Suffragists initially backed down from their platform to encourage suffrage at the state level. This caused Alice Paul to break from NAWS and spearhead the Congressional Union for Women’s Suffrage, which later became the National Women’s Party.

Iron Jawed Angels

As shown in the film Iron Jawed Angels starring Hilary Swank, Alice Paul was wrongfully sent to prison, abused, and brutally force fed during her hunger strike. As observed in the film, only when news of her abuse hit the newspapers did NAWS rejoin the fight for women’s suffrage. Alice Paul went on to protest against the Second World War, loudly suggesting that if women had fought harder for peace during the first World War, a second would not have been necessary.

Women during the Vietnam Conflict

Women continued to go to college and the workplace during the Vietnam Conflict. They burned bras and dispensed free love and cried over lost loved ones while demanding peace. Point to any time where there has been a strategic military agenda in US history and it can be linked to some form of women’s movement. Push back further, take any military conflict anywhere in history, and find the women’s issue being abandoned, covered up, or ignored in light of the more desperately needed action. All these lawful men – supposedly fighting because God calls them to take arms – and the need to protect others abroad is vitally more important to the leadership of the country than any domestic issue at home.

What does war have to do with the Bible? Where is war in the New Testament? Why, to justify conflict, must armed men cite the law of Moses, the Torah -- the idea of a vengeful God? Why, to subjugate and oppress women, are the same tactics and the same books employed?

Religion should be Personal, Not Political

Religion is a very personal and a very private thing. I am not about to tell anyone what God to believe in. I hope for the same courtesy. As such, in matters of law, religion must be kept separate. What God or Jesus would do should have no bearing on matters of law. Issues of women’s rights should not be shoved behind a tank under the guise of national security. No man entered this world without a woman. If men aren’t looking to women for leadership and direction, then at least they should be looking to women as equal partners in any decisions made. But many women who have been handed Bibles by their husbands and fathers don’t believe they have that right. And these men are threatened by the idea of smart, bold, empowered women. It’s far easier to bomb Syria than to face domestic issues at home. Examine these links closely – see them everywhere.

Image Credits and More Articles

Images are courtesy of morgueFile, except in the Iron Jawed Angels section, where the image is part of Public Domain and I found it on Wikipedia under the Alice Paul link.

This is not the first article I've written regarding the subjugation of women. Click to read more:

Teacher Dress Code
Braids or Dreads
Slut Shaming
"Modesty Training"

And other articles about my views on women and religion:
Unchurched
Jazzercise
Aging Grayfully

I encourage you to create an account and write your own articles on Wikinut. Thanks for reading!

Tags

Church, Church And State, Hilary Swank, Iron Jawed Angels, Women Discrimination, Womens Issues, Womens Subservience

Meet the author

author avatar Phyl Campbell
I am "Author, Mother, Dreamer." I am also teacher, friend, Dr. Pepper addict, night-owl. Visit my website -- phylcampbell.com -- or the "Phyl Campbell Author Page" on Facebook.

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Comments

author avatar Connie McKinney
6th Oct 2013 (#)

Good arguments, Phyl. People have the right to believe or not to believe.
Also, women have made progress but still have a ways to go. We are one of the few countries left in the world who has never had a female head of state. Maybe some day.

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
6th Oct 2013 (#)

Thanks, Connie!

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
7th Oct 2013 (#)

Good Morning, Phyl. Good points. I have marched, burned bras - literally and figuratively and been subjected to second class status and unequal pay for the same job, discussed in an article of mine. I only hold out hope when I reflect on those within who understand the necessity of seperation.

Harold Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 until 1994. He is best known as the author of Roe v. Wade.

His quote: “When the government puts its imprimatur on a particular religion it conveys a message of exclusion to all those who do not adhere to the favored beliefs. A government cannot be premised on the belief that all persons are created equal when it asserts that God prefers some.” ― Harry A. Blackmun

This from a man who was originally tapped as a conservative - with whatever definition was in place at that time - who ultimately came to see issues, including women's issues in a different light.


Therefore, I think, it is more than writing articles that we hope someone in government will see or others will agree with or comment on, but more about letting the elected government officials know our thoughts, beliefs and feelings about any issues that arouses our passions by calling, printing the article and sending, or email. If we vote we have voice and unfortunately we do not always use that voice effectively or to reiterate the point. 2 Cents worth~Marilyn

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
8th Oct 2013 (#)

I love your $.02!! Keep it coming!!

You better believe I contact my reps, Marilyn. But voting and advocating to the government, especially in the Bible Belt where I live, only goes so far. Writing and sharing via social media outlets will help give more people talking points when they know what's right, but can't work through other people's arguments.

I knew of Blackmun, and also Louis Brandeis (first Jewish SC member, social justice advocate -- but a great man who came to realize the importance of suffrage to the social justice movement when talking with his secretary and listening to her). I could do articles on both of these fine gentlemen, and I may some day. ;)

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